And Then There’s Dolly…

You may remember Dolly the Ewe – she was a rescue from the animal shelter.  She had been found abandoned and frozen to the ground, emaciated, with 50 pounds of wool hanging from her.   You can read about Dolly; Pinto the BlogDog wrote about her in December, 2014.  It’s his #20 post.

At that time, our good vet, Dr. Matt checked her out.   She’s an old ewe, he said, 7 years or more, she has a bad hip, and he suggested that we not breed her.  “She’s probably too old anyway.”  So, we brought her home, fed her, cleaned her up.  She is one of our flock.

Ha!  I kept her away from Loverboy, the ram last fall – across the pasture for weeks.  Finally, she ended up on his side of the fence.  When I discovered the crayon mark on her back, showing that she had been covered by him, I said to her, “Dolly, you scamp, getting yourself pregnant!  You have a bad hip!  Doctor said you shouldn’t!”

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Dolly in her confinement

That ewe looked me square in the eye and said, “Look here.  I haven’t been near a ram in 7 years.  Loverboy has been flirting with me for weeks now.  And besides, have you checked him out?  He’s a specimen!  No way was I going to miss out on that!”

Well, well, well.

So, late in her gestation, I separated her from the rest of the ewes-in-waiting, brought her into a quiet place where she could rest, and wouldn’t have to walk far from food to water to bed.  She went 8 days over her due-date.  But finally, with no problems at all, she delivered twins – a fine ram and a lovely little ewe.

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Dolly and her lambs, brand new.   That’s the ewe on the left and the ram on the right.  A happy family.

She loves her babies, and she’s a wonderful, tolerant mother.  For a couple weeks, I kept her separated so that her movements could be minimized.  But now that her lambs are a bit older, they three are on pasture with the flock.  She’s happy.

Next time, I’ll put a chastity belt on her.

 

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This entry was posted in #lamb, Ag Production, Education, For Kids, Livestock Production, Sheep, Women in Agriculture. Bookmark the permalink.

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